Maya Angelou: Poet is first black woman on US quarter

Maya Angelou: Poet is first black woman on US quarter

Maya Angelou: Poet is first black woman on US quarter
The US Treasury has minted coins featuring poet Maya Angelou - the first black woman ever featured on the US 25-cent coin known as a quarter.

The US Treasury has minted coins featuring poet Maya Angelou - the first black woman ever featured on the US 25-cent coin known as a quarter.

Angelou, a poet and activist, was the first black woman to write and perform a poem at a presidential inauguration.

Coins are planned for other pioneering women, including an astronaut, a tribal chief and an actress - as part of the American Women Quarters programme.

The move was hailed by the nation's first female treasury secretary.

"Each time we redesign our currency, we have the chance to say something about our country - what we value, and how we've progressed as a society," Janet Yellen said in a statement on Monday.

Angelou - an author and social activist - died in 2014 at the age of 86.

Obituary: Maya Angelou

She shot to distinction with her momentous self-portrayal in 1969, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, about her adolescence in the Deep South.

She got many privileged degrees and composed north of 30 top of the line works. In 2010, she was given a Presidential Medal of Freedom - the most elevated US regular citizen grant - by President Barack Obama.

The new quarter portrays Angelou with open and outstretched arms. Behind her is a flying bird and rising sun, which are "roused by her verse and representative of the manner in which she lived", the US depository division said.

The front side of the quarter shows the customary bust of George Washington, the country's first president.

The US Mint intends to give 20 additional quarters throughout the following four years, portraying other American ladies who assumed significant parts in the nation's set of experiences.

Coins are additionally arranged for this present year for Sally Ride, the main female US space explorer; Wilma Mankiller, the principal female head of the Cherokee Nation and a campaigner for native freedoms; and Anna May Wong, who is viewed as the primary Chinese-American film star in Hollywood.

Plans to supplant President Andrew Jackson on the $20 note with dark abolitionist Harriet Tubman - who saved oppressed individuals through the Underground Railroad - are as yet in progress.

Recorded ladies have seldom included on US money.

In the nineteenth Century, the primary US First Lady, Martha Washington, was on the $1 silver authentication and Native American heroine Pocahontas was in a gathering picture on the $20 note.

On coins, Sacagawea, a Native American traveler, shows up on the gold dollar. Suffragist Susan B Anthony and hard of hearing visually impaired extremist Helen Keller showed up on the silver dollar and Alabama quarter individually.